National Historic Landmarks, St. George Island

Abandoned Pump House and Winch House

National Register of Historic Places Inventory Nomination Form text:

Circa 1951. Two small buildings: one concrete and one [wood] frame. Winch used to load and unload materials and boats at townside dock. Severe beach erosion has undermined the foundations (Faulkner 1986).

Photo of boat on beach with heavy surf near dock winch and pump houses.
Old dock winch and pump houses, May 1960 (Baltzo collection).
Photo of abandoned pump house with missing roof near rocky shore.
Old dock winch and pump houses, May 1960 (Baltzo collection).

Plumbing and Electrical Shop

National Register of Historic Places Inventory Nomination Form text:

Circa 1951. A two-story, wood frame structure with horizontal siding has severe structural deficiencies. It was rebuilt after Saint George fire of 1950 (Faulkner 1986).

Photo of three with buildings with a small ship in the distance. Plumbing and electrical shop is center building.
Plumbing and Electrical Shop, center, May 1960 (Baltzo Collection).
Photo of the plumbing and electrical shop, a white building on rocky shore.
Plumbing and electrical shop, October 18, 2006 (NOAA).

Sealing Plant

National Register of Historic Places Inventory Nomination Form text:

1951. This complex burned down in 1950 and was rebuilt over the original foundation. A wood frame building with concrete walls. Older methods of processing are reflected in this building and its extant equipment: wash house, kench house with tables, brine tanks and blubbering house, and a cooperage upstairs where some barrel staves remain. Skins were placed in redwood vats with large metal waffle grates placed on top to hold them down while they were flushed with sea water. These vats remain in the wash house as do the blubbering racks in the blubbering house. The 12’x12’ kench tables, some still holding skins in salt for storage, are intact. The salting process was replaced by the newer brine process. Here skins were placed in a redwood tank, agitated by a paddle wheel, hung to dry, packed in borax, rather than salt, and then shipped to the Fouke Company. The extant redwood tank may be the last of its kind. Cement tanks with slat boxes and a re-designed paddle wheel replaced the redwood tank. Presently, National Marine Fisheries (NMF) personnel are in the process of converting part of the ground floor into a laboratory with living quarters upstairs. Previously, NMF personnel added some removable fencing in the wash house creating seal pens used in conducting seal behavior experiments. Other than these changes to the interior, which are consistent with its historic use, the seal processing facility retains its historical integrity (Faulkner 1986).

Click here to read the Seal Plant Restoration Report (pdf).
Photo of large building
Photo of southeasterly view of large white building.
Photo of several large white buildings near water.

St. George Sealing Plant Videos

Click on the following links to watch videos

Machine Shop

National Register of Historic Places Inventory Nomination Form text:

Circa 1948. Concrete walls with reinforced steel (not “reinforced concrete”). Has a high gambrel roof. Presently a repair shop. Similar in materials and design to the seal processing plant; good visual integrity (Faulkner 1986).

Photo of the machine shop, a white barn-shaped building.
Machine Shop, fall 2006 (NOAA).
Photo of a northeasterly view of the machine shop, a white barn-shaped building.
Machine Shop, September 9, 1985 (NMML Photo Library).

Coal Shed

National Register of Historic Places Inventory Nomination Form text:

Built in the 1930s. Concrete walls up to fifteen feet high pocketed into hillside, thus one side of the building is at grade near the eave line, while the other side has full-height concrete walls. Most recently used for storage. Needs structural repairs (Faulkner 1986).

Photo of the roof of the coal shed, a long building with an alternating flat and angled roof.
Coal shed, October 18, 2006 (NOAA).
Photo of the northeasterly view of the coal shed, a long building with an alternating flat and angled roof and a picket fence.
Coal Shed, September 10, 1985 (NMML Photo Library).
Photo of the southwesterly view of the coal shed, a white  building.
Coal Shed, September 10, 1985 (NMML Photo Library).

Aleutian Bunkhouse

National Register of Historic Places Inventory Nomination Form text:

Built in the 1940s. Single story wood frame dwelling. Originally housed Aleutian workers brought in for the seal harvest and processing; presently the teacher’s house (Faulkner 1986).

Supplemental information provided by NOAA:

Construction of a new bunkhouse for Aleutian workers began in 1938 with the pouring of the concrete foundation. Construction was completed in 1939 (Bower 1940, 148; Bower 1941, 161).

St. George the Great Martyr Church

National Register of Historic Places Inventory Nomination Form text:

Circa 1936. Listed on the National Register of Historic Places. Significant objects within the Church include articles dating to the previous nineteenth century Church: a chandelier, chalice and crosses, 1845; five bells, 1875: a redwood cross fashioned from wood from the old church by Mr. Andronik P. Kashevarof of St. George. Icons with historical interest include “Saint Petroluman” [sic] from the old church and “Virgin Mary” and “Our Lord Jesus Christ” worked by Father Theodosius. Handworked altar cloths made by the women of Saint George date back fifty years. This is only a representative sample of the treasures in this Church. The building is well cared for on a routine basis but in need of structural repairs. (Faulkner 1986)

Photo from 2006 of a white church, St. George the Great Martyr Church.
St. George the Great Martyr Church, October 18, 2006 (NOAA).
Photo from 1960 of a white church, St. George the Great Martyr Church.
St. George the Great Martyr Church, June 30, 1960 (NMML Photo Library).

Company House

National Register of Historic Places Inventory Nomination Form text:

Built in 1930. Three story, wood frame building with horizontal siding and six-over-six windows. Upper floor: sleeping rooms and bath; middle floor: sleeping rooms, bath and library with built in wood and glass bookcases, original books in place; ground floor: kitchen and dining area. Recently, new wooden fire escapes were added, replacing ladders nailed to the side of the building. Company House was renamed Saint George Rooming House in 1930 as the property of the Bureau of Fisheries; now owned by Tanaq Corporation and used as a hotel (Faulkner 1986).

Photo of the company house, a multi-storied white house.
Company House (Aikow Hotel), October 18, 2006 (NOAA).
Photo of two views of the company house, a northeasterly view and a northerly view of the road in front of the house.
Company House (Aikow Hotel), September 9, 1985 (NMML Photo Library).

Supplemental information provided by NOAA:

1930–1931 Company House/Aikow Hotel—The Company House was a 30 ft. x 56 ft. building constructed on a hillside for the accommodation of unmarried employees and transients. The open basement allowed for a dining room, kitchen, and cook’s quarters. The main floor contained three bedrooms, a bathroom, and a library. The upper floor also had three bedrooms and a bathroom (Bower 1931, 74; Bower 1932, 76). In 2001, the building was restored as the Aikow Hotel by the St. George Tanaq Corporation with Crab Disaster Relief Funds. In the current structure, four bedrooms and two bathrooms are on the main floor. The upper floor has six bedrooms and two bathrooms. The dining/kitchen areas and library room remain, but the cook’s quarters is now used for storage.