National Historic Landmarks, St. George Island (Cont.)

Cottages

National Register of Historic Places Inventory Nomination Form text:

Circa 1930s. One and one-half story cement [concrete walled, wood frame, 2nd floor] bungalows exactly alike. Originally homes for the agent, storekeeper, physician, and schoolteacher. One was also the old hospital. Presently housing for NMF personnel and community (Faulkner 1986).

Photo of white cottage.
Cottage A, October 18, 2006 (NOAA).
Photo of white cottage with red roof.
Cottage D, October 18, 2006 (NOAA).

Supplemental information provided by NOAA:

Government Employee Houses
1923.
Construction on a dispensary and physician’s quarters began in 1922 (Cottage C) and was completed in 1923. The building’s dimensions are 24 ft. x 32 ft. Also therein was an office, living room, bedroom, bath, a large surgery on the main floor, and two small bedrooms on the upper floor (Bower 1923, 83; Bower 1925a, 112).

1924. Concrete walls for an additional government employee dwelling began in 1924 (Bower 1925b, 143).

1925–26. Construction began on a house for the schoolteachers in 1925 and was completed in 1926 (Bower 1927, 307).

1926–27. Construction began on another house for white employees in 1926 and was completed in 1927 (Bower 1927, 307, Bower 1928, 146).

1939. Fences and sidewalks were constructed around the government employee houses (Bower 1941, 161–162).

Community Hall

National Register of Historic Places Inventory Nomination Form text:

Built in 1949. Large [wood] frame structure with a double gable roof line. Construction began in 1940 but was delayed by the evacuation of the island in 1942 (Faulkner 1986).

Photo of the community hall, a multi-storied beige building with a blue roof.
Community Hall, October 18, 2006 (NOAA).
Photo of the community hall, a multi-storied beige building with a blue roof.
Community Hall, October 18, 2006 (NOAA).

Supplemental information provided by NOAA:

Construction on a new community hall began in 1940 (Bower 1942, 161).

Former Firehouse

National Register of Historic Places Inventory Nomination Form text:

Wood frame with horizontal clapboard siding with a bell tower rising from the southwest corner. Remodeled as living quarters; presently identified as Quarters No. 7 (Faulkner 1986).

Photo of new firehouse, a small white building with three garage doors.
Former Firehouse, October 18, 2006 (NOAA).

Former Power Plant

National Register of Historic Places Inventory Nomination Form text:

A diesel generator-driven power plant was constructed on St. George Island between 1936 and 1937. The plant facilities included eleven aboveground storage tanks (ASTs) used to store diesel fuel, gasoline, and lubricating oil, as well as a wood-framed building that housed the generators.

Photo of a group of white buildings including the former power plant on left on photo.
Former Power Plant, left, May 1960 (Baltzo Collection).

Supplemental information provided by NOAA:

The ASTs were located on wooden platforms along the west and southwest sides of the building. Fuel was supplied to the ASTSs, via a gravity fed pipeline, from drums staged at the Former Fuel Storage Area located south of the power plant (see Document Library, St. George Island Site Closure Documents TPA Site 9:Old Power Plant).

Aleut Laborers' Housing

National Register of Historic Places Inventory Nomination Form text:

Housing on St. George, in keeping with the company nature of the community, came in three varieties: (I) Wood frame, one and one-half story with gable roof and arctic entry; 1920s-1930s; (II) Same basic house type as (I), only concrete; 1930s (only two of these built because St. George Island lacked gravel for concrete); (III) larger frame houses, same basic type, all with green asphalt siding; 1940s-1950s (Faulkner 1986).

Supplemental information provided by NOAA:

Native Inhabitants
1913.
House No. 8 was said to be the oldest house on St. George in 1913 when it was torn down. At the time four houses were considered too small for the families living therein. One family consisted of husband, wife, and six children; another, of husband and wife and seven children. These two family homes were enlarged with the addition of bedrooms built on the outside, and they were still considered too small. In a third home, the family numbered twelve in size. The house, considered one of the largest on the island, was described as having a kitchen and three rooms, all of which were being used as sleeping rooms. The largest room measured 11x12 ft., the next 9x11 ft., and the other 7x11 ft. It was said that the houses on St. George were essentially the same type as those on St. Paul (Evermann 1914, 152).

1918. Natives occupied two newly constructed houses (Bower 1919, 80).

1921–22. Construction on the first of two concrete dwellings for the Aleut Natives began in 1921. Both dwellings were completed and occupied in 1922. Each contained a “roomy vestibule, kitchen, living room, and three bedrooms on the first floor, and space for two small bedrooms on the second floor” (Bower 1922, 53; Bower 1923, 83).

1923. A concrete duplex was constructed in 1923 (Bower 1925a, 112).

1927. One four-room and three five-room wood frame houses were constructed during 1927. According to the record, “The limited supply of sand and gravel makes it impracticable to construct any considerable number of concrete buildings on this island” (Bower 1928, 146).

1928. Ten four-room, wood frame houses on concrete foundations were constructed in 1928 (Bower 1929, 298; Bower 1931, 74).

1929–1930. Two five-room, two four-room, and two three-room Native homes were constructed (Bower 1930, 309).

1938. Three, three-room wooden frame houses were constructed for Aleuts in 1938 (Bower 1940, 148).

1948. Construction began on two new Native homes (U.S. Dept. of the Interior, Fish and Wildlife Service 1952, 45).

Wood frame houses, 1 ½ story

National Register of Historic Places Inventory Nomination Form text:

Wood frame, one and one-half story with gable roof and arctic entry; 1920s–1930s (Faulkner 1986).

Photo of a row of white houses with colored trim.
Wood frame houses, October 18, 2006 (NOAA).

Concrete houses, 1 ½ story

National Register of Historic Places Inventory Nomination Form text:

Concrete, one and one-half story with gable roof and arctic entry; 1930s (Faulkner 1986).

Photo of concrete house, a house with concrete walls and wooden roof.
Concrete house, October 18, 2006 (NOAA).

Larger frame houses, green asphalt siding

National Register of Historic Places Inventory Nomination Form text:

Larger frame houses, same basic type as I and II, all with green asphalt siding, 1940s–1950s (Faulkner 1986).

Photo of a collection of frame houses in a variety of colors.
Larger frame houses, October 18, 2006 (NOAA).